Patterns for Gingerbread Houses & Beyond

6 Dec

Gingerbread Patterns

photo by Look at My Photos

Here’s the great big Kung Foodie collection of gingerbread links!

I’ve spent a number of hours combing the web for the best house pattern links. This is an edited list of the ones I found to be the most unique and/or well documented. The King Arthur Flour website has probably the easiest and most detailed tutorial on building gingerbread houses. If you’re a beginner this is the best place to start.

Unusual Creations

Advanced Patterns

Traditional Plans

*recommended by Heidi at 101 Cookbooks

Gingerbread Books

Baking Tips

  • Place aluminum foil or parchment under dough before rolling and cutting pieces. You can then easily move the foil/parchment to a baking pan without having to touch the dough. Just start with a fresh piece of foil for each batch.
  • Roll your dough thin. Gingerbread will puff up a bit as a cooks. The thicker the pieces the harder it is to match edges, as well as keep your structure from falling apart due to weight.
  • If your edges have curled while cooking you can quickly use a pizza cutter to trim them.
  • Gingerbread fresh out of the oven is often still soft and can be molded into shape by placing on cans or other objects while cooling.

Frosting Tips

  • If you feel safe making a batch of caramelized sugar glacee this holds much better than royal icing as a base mortar (although I wouldn’t recommend this if you have kids helping as it gets very hot and can easily cause burns).
  • Make plenty of royal icing* ahead of time. There’s nothing worse than running out in the middle of mortaring a wall or frosting decorations.
  • Ziploc baggies are great to use if you run out of disposable pastry bags while piping frosting. The mini sizes work perfectly if you just need a small amount of colored icing.
  • Shuna at Eggbeater once showed me a great pastry bag trick during a cooking class she instructed. Just use a clothespin to pinch the cut end of the pastry bag shut if you need to stop in the middle of working. A small spring paperclip would also work (tho it’s not as cool).

* I prefer to use an eggless royal icing recipe which calls for meringue powder, which I get at my local baking supply shop. It’s possible that any store which carries Wilton products will have it as well.

2 Responses to “Patterns for Gingerbread Houses & Beyond”

  1. sfsweettooth December 16, 2006 at 11:52 am #

    Hi Kungfoodie,
    It’s great to see the gingerbread holiday tradition remembered and featured on your blog. I’m currently making and selling gingerbread houses in San Francisco at a lovely boutique on Russian Hill called La Place du Soleil. The proprietor, Amy, also carries my sugar ornaments…please take a peek at my blog and have a sweet and spicy holiday!
    http://sfsweettooth.blogspot.com
    Marilyn

  2. TravelBetty December 8, 2007 at 5:30 pm #

    That Haunted Mansion gingerbread house is SICK! I want one!

    So nice meeting you last night, Kungfoodie. Hope to see you around the fondue table again soon.

    -tb

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